Monthly Archives: February 2018

CIHC and IIHA Advocate for Older Persons’ Rights in Crisis at the United Nations

 

February 16, 2018, New York – Fifteen years after the international community ratified the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, the Center for International Humanitarian Cooperation and the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs illuminated the plight and called for the rights of older persons at the United Nations Secretariat in New York City.

Humanitarian Action for Older Persons: Fifteen Years After Madrid, a CIHC side event of the 56th Session of the United Nations Commission for Social Development, featured interventions from fellows of the IIHA, Ambassadors from Japan and El Salvador, and representatives of the International Rescue Committee and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Panelists addressed the national and international frameworks and projects that serve older persons and underscored the ongoing challenges in providing ageing populations with adequate humanitarian services.

IIHA Research Fellow on Ageing Ann Pawliczko, PhD opened the event by introducing the inevitable effect that increased life expectancy will have during crises.

“We can expect more older persons to be affected by humanitarian crises and to comprise growing percentages of displaced populations. It is, therefore, essential that disaster risk reduction and preparedness plans as well as humanitarian aid during and after crises recognize and address the unique issues, needs and contributions of older persons and harness their experience in ways that benefit them and their communities,” she said.

His Excellency Ambassador Rubén Hasbún of El Salvador represented the Group of Friends of Older Persons, a diplomatic collective of countries convening on the promotion and protection of human rights of older persons. The ambassador stressed the vulnerability of older persons and called for the UN and its allies to “mainstream ageing and issues of relevance to older persons into development policies,” including in the UN’s current mission to eradicate poverty and promote sustainable development around the world.

Similarly, His Excellency Ambassador Toshiya Hoshino of Japan spoke to the experience and lessons learned in responding to older persons in the aftermath of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami – where 65 percent of those killed were over 60 years old. Japan has the largest percentage of older persons in the world and is one of the most natural disaster-prone countries.

The country’s disaster risk reduction and management mechanisms, therefore, take the unique needs of older persons into account when crafting and implementing disaster risk reduction policies, plans and guidelines. The Ambassador hailed information technology systems in Japan that communicate life-saving information to older persons before, during and after emergencies as a critical component of humanitarian response and recovery. He also emphasized the importance of regarding older persons’ wisdom and experience as valuable assets and integrating them within disaster response frameworks, consistent with the Sendai Framework 2015-2030.

Andrew Painter, Senior Policy Advisor at UNHCR, spoke to the disproportionate impact of displacement on older persons in both emergency and protracted crises. These include health and physical limitations, disruption of social networks, loss of crucial services, and shifting cultural or familial roles, and ultimately isolation. However, he also encouraged the humanitarian community to embrace the contributions of this population.

“There is a very common perception…of older persons as passive, dependent, waiting for aid as opposed to the vital contributors to their community that they can be and that they are: playing roles as leaders of their communities, serving as resources of guidance for advice to younger generations, transmitting  cultures and skills and crafts, contributing to the well-being of their families in many respects and even contributing to peace and reconciliation processes.

For humanitarians, as for all, the challenge in programming is to address the very specific and real needs of older persons but in the context of empowering older persons to really play these roles in communities where they find themselves,” said Painter.

Sandra Vines, Director for Resettlement at International Rescue Committee, also elaborated on the need for protection among older refugees who are resettled in the United States. She spoke of the IRC initiative to help older refugees achieve self-sufficiency through a strengths-based approach by assisting them to access health care, transportation, housing and other services to allow them to thrive.

“Elderly refugees are very resilient and flexible… (they) can live successful and happy lives in the US,” said Vines.

Sylvia Beales, a consultant on Ageing and Inclusive Social Development, pointed out that it is essential to ensure that older persons are included in the implementation of the various frameworks, charters and other mechanisms that address disaster planning and response. She drew particular attention to the five steps of the Inclusion Charter – participation, data, funding, capacity, and coordination –  to deliver impartial and accountable humanitarian assistance that responds to the vulnerability in all its forms, and reaches the most marginalized people, including older persons.

In conclusion, IIHA Research Fellow Rene Desiderio, PhD, noted that while there are noteworthy initiatives addressing the special needs of older persons, such as strengthening and investing in disaster risk reduction, preparedness, resilience, and governance, much more needs to be done.

“With millions of older persons in many parts of the world affected by conflicts, fragility, and vulnerability, and in urgent need of humanitarian assistance and protection, the Agenda for Humanity calls for action to reduce suffering, risk, and vulnerability and that no one is left behind. Moreover, it places an emphasis on ‘reaching the furthest behind first’. It is …a call to all stakeholders, to all concerned citizens, to all of us to get involved or continue to be involved and collectively ensure that older persons are not forgotten and that no older person is left behind,” concluded Dr. Desiderio.

Humanitarian Action for Older Persons: Fifteen Years After Madrid was convened by the Center for International Health and Cooperation and the Institute for International Humanitarian Affairs at Fordham University in collaboration with the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations, the Group of Friends of Older Persons (GoFOP), United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Clare Bollnow, IIHA Research Intern

Angela Wells, IIHA Communications Officer

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IDHA Alumnus Speaks on Importance of Family to Refugees

Samuel McManus serves as a doctor at a clinic for refugees in Oslo, Norway

An article written by IDHA alumnus Samuel McManus was recently featured in the Irish Times. In the piece, entitled “As emigrants, we have different ways of creating ‘home’”, McManus relates his observations of the patients he sees working as a doctor at a clinic for refugees in Oslo, Norway to his own experiences as an immigrant from Ireland.

McManus hones in on the the notion that family helps dissipate feelings of displacement among refugees who are unused their new environs. “But for those who manage to be reunited with their families, they immediately bring the consolations of home to this strange northern land.”, McManus writes.

Click here to read the full article.

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Design for Humanity Initiative

Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs and Vignelli Center for Design Studies Announce Design for Humanity Initiative

February 1, 2018, New York City – At a time of heightened and prolonged crises, humanitarian actors persistently strive to respond to affected communities with more effective and dignified relief and recovery interventions. Similarly, designers and architects endeavor to contribute their skills for social change and humanitarian action to uplift human rights and dignity.

Whether ensuring more dignified shelters and settlements for displaced persons, designing more inclusive and resilient urban ecosystems or employing art and design as a vehicle for advocacy–the possibilities for design and humanitarian action are endless.

The Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs at Fordham University is thus partnering with the Vignelli Center for Design at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the UN Migration Agency (IOM) to launch a three-year Design for Humanity Initiative.

A Design for Humanity Summit will be held on June 22, 2018 at Fordham University. Presenters and participants will identify current best practices, needs, and gaps in the humanitarian sector as well as generate design strategies and future partnerships.

“By facilitating an exchange between humanitarian responders and multi-talented design professionals, we believe both communities can devise and implement more sustainable, human-centered, participatory and innovative design strategies,” said Brendan Cahill, IIHA Executive Director.

“Industrial designers, graphic designers, interior designers, and architects bring critical design thinking and a participatory problem solving process to humanitarian challenges. We innovate to respond to human needs and alleviate real-world problems,” said R. Roger Remington, Director of RIT’s Vignelli Center for Design Studies.

The Summit will explore how innovative design can reshape humanitarian action for the benefit of people affected by crises by highlighting a range of piloted and pioneered design innovations for humanitarian response as well as facilitating future partnership and project implementation.

“Design professionals and the humanitarian community can play a significant role in supporting humanitarian relief processes through more sustainable, human-centered, and participatory design strategies. Bringing together designers, humanitarian practitioners, private sector, academia and government to look at best practices from the field will allow innovative solutions for emergency and protracted crisis response,” said Alberto Preato, IIHA Humanitarian Design Visiting Research Fellow.

Mr. Preato works as Program Manager for the UN Migration Agency (IOM) in Niger where  he coordinates protection and assistance for vulnerable migrants traversing the Sahel on the Central Mediterranean Route and oversees emergency assistance to internally displaced persons in the Lake Chad Basin.

Humanitarian principles of ethics, community participation, and inclusivity will be core themes that remain central to the Summit and follow-up initiatives.

Whether ensuring more dignified housing and settlements for displaced persons, designing urban spaces more resilient to climate change or employing art and design as a vehicle for advocacy – the possibilities for design and humanitarian collaboration are endless.

Humanitarian and design professionals are welcome to join the Design for Humanity Initiative. Sign up here to stay up to date and participate.

Media Contact
Angela Wells, IIHA Communications Officer
awells14@fordham.edu

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