Tag Archives: Lynne Jones

Stories From the Field: Greek Diaries

Have you read the IIHA’s Stories from the Field? In the latest featured piece, Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) Course Director Lynne Jones shares with us the experience of her time in the migrant encampments in Greece.

The Greek Diaries – Lynne Jones

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Stories from the Field: The Greek Diaries by Lynne Jones

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The IIHA’s latest Stories from the Field features the Greek Diaries of Lynne Jones, Director of the Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) course.

 

The Greek Diaries – Lynne Jones

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by | May 27, 2016 · 5:03 pm

Thank You for Attending IIHA’s Event – Frontline Doctors: Winter Migrant Crisis

Thank you to those who attended the Institute for International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) documentary screening of Frontline Doctors: Winter Migrant Crisis on Tuesday, March 15th.

The IIHA’s Spring Event Series, Challenges & Opportunities: Global Migration in the 21st Century is focused on promoting and hosting events focused on global migration. We hope that you will spread the word about the issues raised and continue the conversations sparked during the event. Ways to learn more and engage with the topic of the ongoing migrant crisis:

  • If you are interested in learning more about Dr. van Tulleken’s experience in the refugee camps, check out his article on our blog.
  • Dr. Lynne Jones, Co-Director of the IIHA Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) course, recently volunteered in Calais – one of the camps visited by Dr. van Tulleken – with Help Calais, a crowd funding platform that fund raises to help various projects in the camps. Read more about her experience on our blog.
  • The average stay in a refugee camp is now 17 years. Is it time to rethink how refugee camps are built and managed? Should refugee camps be operated as permanent cities? Check out the Room for Debate on our blog featuring two expert opinions on the future of the refugee camp.

We hope you will join us for our next event featuring Christophe Lobry-Boulanger of the International Federation of Red Cross (IFRC) on Thursday, March 31st at 12:30 p.m. For more information and to RSVP, please visit the event page.

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Room for Debate: Should refugee camps be operated as permanent cities?

Zaatari Refugee Camp

Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, Photo Credit: dezeen magazine

With an estimated 15.1 million refugees around the world, refugee camps have been and have become a fact of life for many. History reveals that refugee camps are rarely if ever truly temporary. Statistics show that the average stay of refugees is now roughly seventeen years – almost two decades that can hardly be thought of as a temporary solution. It is now more than ever time to rethink how refugee camps are built and managed. Kilian Kleinschmidt and Paul Currion offer their differing perspectives and opinions in two recent articles for consideration.

Use Existing Abandoned Cities for Resettlement

A former manager for the Zaatari camp in Jordan, Kilian Kleinschmidt believes the world must move away from thinking of refugee camps as temporary. He suggests that refugees can be resettled and empowered; as many local people have migrated to more urbanized cities for work, why not use those deserted cities as housing for refugees? Kleinschmidt argues these mostly deserted cities could be “development zones” where refugees learn to become self-sustaining.

Urbanize Existing Refugee Camps for Resettlement

Paul Currion takes a different view; making the point that if refugees are unwilling to stay in impoverished or ghost towns in their own countries, what makes anyone think they will want to do the same thing in another country? He argues that these cities would ultimately become benign dictatorships. He argues that ultimately, the issue of the growth of refugee camps is not one of migration, but one of urbanization. As refugee camps grow, they must be managed and governed more as actual cities, not just refugee camps.

The Reality

The refugee camps in Calais, known to many as “The Jungle” are a prime example of camps that were meant to be temporary, but are now showing signs of permanency. The collection of informal settlements developed in 2002 as a staging post for those attempting entry into the United Kingdom, but the camps have now become semi-permanent dwelling places due to the dangers of border crossing and lack of other viable options for settlement. The camps, which are located on an old landfill, house approximately 6,000 refugees. The camps are marked by makeshift tents, overcrowding, and a lack of basic services. Dr. Lynne Jones, Co-Director of the IIHA Mental Health in Complex Emergencies course, recently volunteered in Calais and the IIHA highlighted her experience in a blog post in late November 2015. Dr. Alexander van Tulleken, IIHA Helen Hamlyn Senior Fellow, also recently spoke about his time in the Calais Jungle in his documentary, Frontline Doctors: Winter Migrant Crisis and reflected upon the experience in the article, What Should We Do? Contradictions and Complicity in the European Refugee Crisis. As the IIHA continues its Spring 2016 Event Series, Challenges and Opportunities: Migration in the 21st Century, we encourage you to comment on this pressing issue, and engage with the questions below.

Debate

  • What should the role of the French government be in The Jungle?

  • How can they reconcile the fact that many inhabitants of The Jungle do not want to become part of the French system?

  • Are governments responsible for governing and providing basic infrastructure to people who arrive at their shores?

Please feel free to comment below, or share with your colleagues and networks to start a conversation!

 

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IDHA 47 Continues in Geneva, Switzerland

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The 47th International Diploma in Humanitarian Assistance (IDHA 47) commenced in Geneva, Switzerland on the 31st of January. IDHA 47 consists of 16 students from 13 countries, working with 14 different organizations.

All the students have quickly bonded and are looking forward to one last weekend of paper-writing and studying ahead of next week’s graduation.

Tony Land, Ph.D. (IIHA Senior Fellow), Theo Kruezen (IDHA 9), and Fausto Aarya De Santis (IDHA 44) came together as IDHA 47 tutors, Larry Hollingworth, C.B.E. as the Course Director, and Suzanne Arnold as Course Administrator.

Weeks 1 through 3 have welcomed back many members of the IDHA family as lecturers, including Peter Hansen (IIHA Diplomat in Residence), Tina Szabados (IDHA 2, IDHA Alumni Council Chairperson Emeritus, and CIHC Board Member), Pamela Lupton-Bowers (IDHA Faculty), Florian Razesberger (IDHA 20), Lynne JonesAnnika Sjöberg (IDHA 28), Isabelle Séchaud (IDHA 7), and Jesper Holmer-Lund (IDHA 11).

We wish all the IDHA 47 students the best of luck with all their work this weekend, and look forward to welcoming another group of IDHA graduates in one week’s time.

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Humanitarian Spotlight: Crisis in Calais

The world now faces the largest displacement crisis ever to be recorded, with almost 60 million people forcibly displaced at the end of 2014. For Europe and the United Kingdom, the migration crisis has confronted the region at its shores, and nowhere is this more evident in mainland Europe than in the migrant and refugee encampments of Calais, better known as “the Jungle”. Calais, a port city in northern France, has become a transitory home for migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers trying to enter the United Kingdom. The site has been the locus of ongoing tensions between French authorities and migrant and refugee populations since 2002 when the official Red Cross reception center for migrants was closed due to overcrowding. The collection of informal settlements known as the Jungle developed soon after as a staging post for those attempting entry into the UK, but the camps have now become semi-permanent dwelling places due to the dangers of border crossing and lack of other viable options for settlement. The camps are marked by makeshift tents, overcrowding, and a lack of basic needs and services – squalid conditions that will only deteriorate further if nothing is done to address the situation, especially as the number of inhabitants continues to grow. The population of displaced who inhabit Calais has more than quadrupled since September 2014, now numbering between 6,000 – 7,000 individuals.

Dr. Lynne Jones, Co-Director of the IIHA Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) course, recently volunteered in Calais with Help Calais, a crowd funding platform that has already raised more than £60,000 to help various projects in the camps, and shared her experiences in a diary on Calaid-ipedia.

Reflecting on her decision to volunteer, Lynne commented, “I disliked the stereotype of ‘marauding swarms’. I wanted to find out for myself why people were risking their lives on a daily basis to come to Britain. Calais is only 6 hours away. So often, Europeans will go to remote places, while there are people on our doorstep who need help. It seemed only logical to find out how I could be useful.” Lynne found a sizeable network of people who offer their help and services in the absence of much structured humanitarian response. The internet has also contributed greatly to galvanizing volunteers.

As can be expected, the volunteers and refugees in Calais face similar issues to those plaguing the larger humanitarian system including problems of coordination, logistics, how to reach the most vulnerable, funding, and navigating the tensions between the arriving populations and the host community, local authorities, and national government. The broader concerns of host government responsibility and the lack of durable solutions for displaced populations also echo those that hinder humanitarian efforts around the world. Yet despite these challenges and the uncertainty of the future, a community continues to form in the Jungle

Read Lynne’s Jungle Diary!

Lynne Jones, O.B.E. FRCPsych., Ph.D., is a Visiting scientist, FXB Center for Health & Human Rights, Harvard University and Consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, Cornwall Partnership Foundation NHS Trust. She is also the Co-Director of the IIHA Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) Training Course, which is organized in cooperation with UNHCR, HealthNet TPO, and International Medical Corps (IMC). View our recent blog post about this year’s MHCE course in Addis. The next course is scheduled for Fall 2016.

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Humanitarian Newsletter: November 25 – December 9, 2015

Read the latest humanitarian newsletter featuring a special Humanitarian Spotlight on the Crisis in Calais, informed by the perspective of Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) Course Co-Director, Lynne Jones, O.B.E. FRCPsych., Ph.D. This edition also features a preview of CIHC’s upcoming Giving Tuesday campaign, IIHA Alumni Updates, and Humanitarian events and opportunities!

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Alumni Reunion: Bishnu, Sarah, Jennifer, and Caitlin (MHCE 11)

78MHCE 11 Course Participants Bishnu Waiba, Sarah Wakeen, Jennifer van Wyck and Caitlin Cockroft-McKay, students from Nepal, the USA, Canada, and the UK, just before the closing ceremony when certificates were given out by Course Directors Larry Hollingworth, Lynne Jones, and Peter Ventevogel.

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Humanitarian Newsletter: October 14-28, 2015

Read the latest IIHA Newsletter with a spotlight on World Mental Health Day 2015 and the recent Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) course organized by CIHC and IIHA, UNHCR, HealthNet TPO, and International Medical Corps (IMC).

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Addressing Mental Health and Psychosocial Needs in Emergencies

This past Saturday marked World Mental Health Day (WMHD) 2015, a day spearheaded by the World Federation for Mental Health to promote dignified, humane treatment of those with mental illness. The day comes only weeks following the UN’s approval of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which include a new target to address to mental health needs. In recognition of WMHD 2015, events were hosted around the world to promote this year’s theme of “Dignity in Mental Health. The renewed attention to mental health and psychosocial issues highlights the fact that hundreds of millions of people around the world are afflicted by mental health problems, yet many still suffer in silence, or are victims of stigma, discrimination and abuse.

From September 20-30, the IIHA, in partnership with United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), HealthNet TPO, and International Medical Corps (IMC), hosted its 11th annual Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE) training course to discuss and address some of the challenges of providing mental health and psychosocial care in (post) conflict areas or in complex disaster settings. The course, held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, welcomed back Course Directors Larry Hollingworth, C.B.E., Humanitarian Programs Director, CIHC; Lynne Jones, O.B.E. FRCPsych., Ph.D., Visiting Scientist, FXB Center for Health & Human Rights, Harvard University and Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Cornwall Partnership Foundation NHS Trust; and Peter Ventevogel, M.D., Senior Mental Health Officer, UNHCR. The Course Directors and Faculty organized a program that effectively balanced academic theory with practical experience, equipping students with the knowledge and skills needed to respond to psychosocial and mental health needs in complex humanitarian emergencies and relief situations. Participants learned the critical importance of understanding the humanitarian context, while gaining practical tools of how to conduct needs assessments, monitor and evaluate projects, and promote security and self-care.

One of the participants of the MHCE course, Caitlin Cockcroft-McKay, Psychosocial Project Coordinator at HealthNet TPO, recently shared with us a personal testimonial of the course:

I feel very privileged to have been a part of the Mental Health in Complex Emergencies training in Ethiopia. It was a fantastically well-organised event, a great networking opportunity & a wonderful learning experience. Much of what I learnt during the ten days is directly applicable to my work in South Sudan and has helped to guide me in my planning for monitoring the quality of the programme we’re implementing. It will also help me to prepare for future projects, knowing that I have learnt from the best and that I can ensure projects are the best they can be for the people they are created for.

The combination of lectures & interactive learning sessions and workshops was fantastic as it gave a real opportunity to learn academic theory, background and research as well as to use skills we developed during the course. A real highlight for me was a practical session whereby we were in roleplay as refugees. Given the internationally diverse nature of the participants, we were able to realistically enact having border authorities who spoke a different language from the majority. It provided us with an experience of what it must be like to be refugees, moving as families through a setting that is totally unknown. It was humbling to realise that Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) services are a basic human right, and should be fundamentally integrated into every single area of our programming in the humanitarian sector. We work in these difficult contexts to save lives and alleviate the suffering of people who have already lost so much, but we can’t do that without focusing on MHPSS.

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