Tag Archives: RiF

Asylum Seekers Find Refuge in NYC Grassroots Organizations

 

New York City, May 8, 2017 In his home of Nigeria, Audu Kadiri was a relentless humanitarian: a human rights and healthcare advocate working on behalf of HIV/AIDS patients. But when he began to stand up against draconian laws criminalizing access to healthcare for the LGBTI community he faced opposition and eventually threats to his life.

Today he is in exile in New York City, waiting for his asylum interview that would allow him to fully start his life over. As a community activist at African Communities Together, he has not stopped in his pursuit of justice.

Last month, the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) and the Graduate Program in International Political Economy and Development hosted Audu at a Fordham University event entitled, Seeking Refuge in New York City. He was joined by Ellie Alter, Associate Director of Refugee and Immigrant Fund (RiF); Sydney Kornegay, Director of RDJ Shelter for asylum seekers; and Ahmed Awney, a Libyan architect, filmmaker, and asylum seeker.

Asylum seekers enter the country with a visa, such as a student or tourist visa. They apply for asylum upon arrival to seek protection from persecution, because of their religion, sexuality, political affiliation, or other reasons.

In other countries this process is commonly known as “Refugee Status Determination” in which an asylum seeker applies for refugee status, affording them sanctuary in their first country of arrival. The very lucky few, roughly one percent, are resettled to another country. The United States has had a long-tradition of resettling refugees after a long vetting process. Resettled refugees receive assistance from governmental agencies for access to housing, job placement, and documentation, which is not the case for asylum seekers.  

According to RiF, approximately 40,000 people applied for asylum in New York City in 2016 while 215 refugees were resettled in the city from abroad.   

“Resettled refugees are immediately assigned an organization, one of nine NGOs contracted by the US government, to support them from the day they get here with the basic needs that anyone should receive coming into the US as a refugee. In contrast, “when an asylum seeker gets here they are really facing a long road of a lack of support. There are not a ton of resources out there that we can lead them to, unfortunately…RiF was founded to fill this void of initial support,” explained Ellie.

Because asylum seekers arrive to a host country immediately after fleeing, they are often ill-prepared for the challenges ahead. In the United States, they have no legal right to work until they complete an arduous and lengthy application process. A shortage of attorneys who take asylum cases forces many to apply with little to no legal guidance, lowering their chances of securing protection. Furthermore, this application process causes many to live in what feels like perpetual limbo for asylum seekers who are also far from their families and support systems.

Many, therefore, rely on grassroots organizations like RiF and RDG Shelter to provide food, shelter and legal guidance. Organizations like these also offer physical and psychological space for community and acceptance in a foreign country.

When communities open their doors to asylum seekers, they participate in humanitarian action in their own backyards. Volunteers in New York dedicate their time to teaching English, cooking meals, organizing fundraisers, representing them in court, and donating food. Most importantly, they offer companionship, which the panelists agreed is a rewarding commitment.

“Just show up, show your face…that means a lot to a grassroots organization like ours,” said Ellie.

In today’s political climate, many asylum seekers waiting for their interviews fear they may not be successful in their pursuit of protection as they initially hoped.

“They are leaving it all behind, it is not easy. You are leaving all you have, all you have worked for to come to a new life,” said Audu.

In order to protect asylum seekers and other immigrants in the United States, Audu advocates that refugees and asylum seekers must be “shown respect instead of being looked at like a liability or a pest….and viewed as a human first, one who simply needs assistance.”

To learn more, watch the event on Facebook Live.

Rosalyn Kutsch, IIHA Student Outreach Intern

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Alumni Update: Chantal Kakozi (IDHA 45)

20161031_142149 Chantal Kakozi (IDHA 45) was recently granted asylum in the United States. We extend our congratulations to Chantal on this next step in her journey!

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RIF to hold next Asylum Seekers Meeting at Fordham University

14716219_604188369767315_1823985820247805721_nEach month the IIHA supports RIF to host Saturday gatherings for asylum seekers to learn and share information about living in New York. Experts and former asylum seekers will address topics such as education, job preparation, resume building, green-industry opportunities and social services. Learn more!

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Fordham University Event: Well-Founded Fear Film Screening

Well Founded Fear Flyer

This semester, the IIHA has organized its Spring 2016 Event Series to focus on the timely topic of Global Migration in the 21st Century. The most recent event in the series was a screening of the film, Well-Founded Fear, organized by the Visual Arts at Fordham University in collaboration with the RIF – Support for Asylum Seekers in NYC. This film takes a detailed and personal look at the process of attaining political asylum in the United States, and attempts to add a more personal and detailed aspect to the question “Who is a refugee?”

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NYC Event: RiF Asylum Support Group at Fordham University

RiF Logo

RIF Asylum Support Group

Tuesday, October 6th, 1:00 PM

Fordham University, McMahon Hall, 155 W 60th Street, Room 109


Guest speakers: Marilee Johns, (IRC Resettlement Supervisor) & Leonie Guei

Marilee from the IRC will make a presentation on programs available for asylum seekers and for those who have been granted asylum

Leonie Guei, a former asylum seeker now US citizen will share about entering Brooklyn Law School

For more information, please contact info@rifnyc.org, call 917-517-6781, or visit www.RIFnyc.org

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